Erectile dysfunction and Canadian pharmacy viagra

Monday, September 8th, 2014 No Commented
Categorized Under: Erectile dysfunction, Men's Health

Erectile dysfunction and canadian generic viagra, while not life threatening, is a common condition that can result in withdrawal from sexual intimacy and reduced quality of life. ED is associated with chronic illnesses and medications used to treat these illnesses. Psychological or relationship issues often coexist and can contribute to, or result from, ED. Therefore, a wide range of health care providers must be aware of ED and knowledgeable about the etiology of ED and its treatment options. Advocates of particular ED treatments have suggested that peer-reviewed published randomized trial reports may exaggerate the costs and adverse events associated with these treatments. Other sources of drug safety data (e.g., drug company press releases or the FDA Web page) that are not peer-reviewed may provide more biased data and, therefore, were not extensively used in this report.
This report estimates potential costs to VHA for providing Viagra and other treatments using sets of reasonable assumptions about ED prevalence, dosage and frequency of use. Literature searches conducted in the course of this systematic review discovered no published economic analyses of ED treatments. In the absence of data collected specifically for cost estimation and of rigorously conducted economic analyses with sensitivity analyses, other sets of assumptions may be equally reasonable and would lead inevitably to different aggregate cost estimates. Thus, postulating or hypothesizing as to a true net cost-utility or cost-benefit ratio at this time could be incorrect in either direction.

The prevalence of ED increases with age and comorbid conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, neurologic and psychiatric conditions, smoking and some surgical therapies. Because these conditions are highly prevalent in patients treated within VA, ED is likely to be a major and increasingly important health care issue both in terms of quality of life as well as resource utilization. If results from non-VA population based studies are extrapolated to male veteran users of the VA medical system, an estimated 1.7 million veterans may have some degree of ED. The number of men seeking help is likely to increase with enhanced awareness of ED and its increased treatment options.

Advocates of particular ED treatments have suggested that men seeking these treatments may have undiscovered underlying serious diseases, which cause ED, diagnosed and treated. The availability of ED treatments could thus contribute to improving health care quality and possibly to improving population health. This hypothesis remains untested; its validity would rely on the extent to which early intervention in these diseases does lead to improved outcomes.